Friday, January 31, 2014

Humanities: Speak & New Design Challenge: How Might We Improve 8th Grade Orientation?

A few weeks ago, Guidance asked Mr. Dunbar and Mr. Ryder if our students would be interested in redesigning eighth graders' high school orientation experience.  We said yes.  (We did not consult you folks; we just figured you'd be keen on doing a project around something that actually matters, will actually happen, and for which you have a lot of expertise as you went though it all yourselves.

All of the work we do for the next several weeks will be about the following design challenge:

How might we improve the eight grader's orientation to the high school?

We did some writing in the lobby, the food court, and the forum, three places were the current ninth grade spent a lot of time last spring and fall.   We tried to recapture our experiences in those places.   We've done some examining of that writing, and will finish off that work on Friday -- for now.

This week, we started Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson.  One reason we are reading it now?  It's all about a girl and her transition into ninth grade and dealing with very grown up situations.  We are going to be using the "reciprocating questions" strategy a great deal -- where you folks as Mr. Ryder questions that stem from the reading.

And finally we started on Roots 9.

This blog post is a bit of a messy catchall for the week.  We will get back on more proper track next week with the blog.

HOMEWORK:

Blog: 3+ posts
Req'd Post: "Ten Lies."  Make up a your own list of "Ten Lies" inspired by the list in Speak.  You may want to come with "Ten Lies They Tell You About Freshman Year" or "Ten Lies They Told Me on the First Day that I Found Out Weren't True on the Second."  How creative and insightful can you be?




Vocab: Roots 9
Study & Complete: Word Map or Roots Product
Roots Quiz: Thursday Feb 6 over 6 to 9

PACE: Introducing the Pitching Power Project & More Introducing of Macbeth

We'll start with a NoRedInk.com MUGS quiz over Commonly Confused Words #1.

Remember, if you are not satisfied with the degree of your understanding, study, come to me for extra help and explanation, look for examples online, show me evidence of practice and I will let you retake the quiz to show your growth.

From there, we will explore Macbeth by looking at some famous lines from the play in one of the tools in the Google Drive.  We'll try to determine what the line might be saying without having seen or read the rest of the play.  The idea is to make a prediction based on an interpretation of the words and then see if it bears out.   These are fairly famous lines -- let's see if we can figure out why.

You will then have time to work on your teaser posters.  Think about how using a line of dialogue could transform those posters.

Finally, we can talk more about the projects.  There are some more parts and pieces in the Google Drive to look at - show bible examples and such. And you can see the rubric that will be updated next week here.

HOMEWORK
Blog: 3+ Posts

Req'd Blog Post: Create a teaser poster for a new film version of Macbeth.  Look at these examples of teaser posters, posters intended to generate interest well in advance of a movie coming out.  They tend to be very minimal and only hint and suggest as what is to come in the film.  They also tend to rely and on people already being somewhat familiar with the characters and/or story.

Examples of teaser posters here.

Sunday, January 26, 2014

AP Lit: The Boarding House & Hamlet

Today in class we will return to Hamlet.  Act III.

Then it is all about "The Boarding House," our third reading from Joyce's Dubliners. We will do an activity in which we draw out the characters from the short story and then prove our choices using textual evidence.

We'll follow this with some work on applying the drawing activity to more traditional analysis.

HOMEWORK

Blog: 3+ Posts
Req'd Post #1:
Using a tool such a Polyvore.com or Pinterest or even just by finding images from various sources, design the wardrobe for one character from each of the following stories by Joyce. Include an explanation for each.  For an added challenge, try to find commonalities or visual connections between them.  Joyce created a collection of stories, try to think of the same as you complete this work.
"Eveline"
"Araby"
"The Boarding House" 

Req'd Post #2:
Read and Annotate "How to Read Literature Like a Prof" Chap 22.  "He's Blind for a Reason You Know

Indie Book Projects:
Due Wednesday, Jan 29
Graded Class Discussion Wednesday

MUGS: Apostrophes #3
Quiz: Apostrophes 3
Due: Friday, Jan 31

PACE: A Fresh Start for Some, A Continuing Journey for Others

Today, we start our grammar work with MUGS.

Here's how it works:

MUGS (Mechanics, Usage, Grammar & Spelling) Learning and Assessing

Every Monday, you will receive a new assignment and grammar focus on NoRedInk.com. You can choose to complete that assignment or not.  It is formative.  It does not count toward your standards grades.

Every Friday, you will have a quiz over that grammar focus.  This will count toward your standards grades.

You may retake any quiz as many times as you like, as long as you first demonstrate evidence that you have practiced and increased your knowledge by using NoRedInk.com or other resources.

For Example
I take the quiz.  I am unsure of my thinking and skills.  I do not meet standard, scoring a 55 on the quiz. 
So, I use NoRedInk and complete some of the practice exercises.  I take screenshots and send them to Mr. Ryder, who can also monitor student activity on NoRedInk.com.   
Mr. Ryder makes another version of the quiz for me take.  I take and exceed the standard by getting them all correct. 
At the end of the 3rd quarter, the MODE (most frequent) of the scores will be recorded as your MUGS grade.  You will also have MUGS scores from other products (writings, projects) included in the quarter.
After getting set up on MUGS, we will watch a very short film.  Actually, it's a music video from the band, Woodkid.


Woodkid "Run Boy Run" from WOODKID on Vimeo.

We'll do a little activity to see if we can the whole story of this video in as few words as possible.

(Here's what we came up with.)





Which leads us to .  . .

Macbeth.

Macbeth is a long play by William Shakespeare.

Here's the whole thing.

We will read a version that is only 32-seconds long.

The film version we will watch leaves a great deal out.  It was made in 28 days and by one of the greatest filmmakers that ever lived. (Legit.  Orson Welles.  Look him up.)

Here's the whole thing.

Macbeth - Orson Welles from Elariooo on Vimeo.

We will watch a little at a time, discuss, and follow along with the text to see where things change and why.

Now, you have everything you need to go at your own PACE on this work.  There is a folder in the PACE OUT folder with the script, a Spark Notes study guide, and the film.  We'll be working with the play for the next several weeks, so if you want to follow teacher PACE, great! If you want to work through the play on your own terms, AWESOME!  We'll be talking about the teacher PACE project this week and you can choose from there if that's what you'd like to make or if you have other ideas in mind.

HOMEWORK
Blog: 3+ Posts

Req'd Blog Post: Create a teaser poster for a new film version of Macbeth.  Look at these examples of teaser posters, posters intended to generate interest well in advance of a movie coming out.  They tend to be very minimal and only hint and suggest as what is to come in the film.  They also tend to rely and on people already being somewhat familiar with the characters and/or story.

Examples of teaser posters here.

MUGS: Commonly Confused Words 1






Quiz: Friday, Jan 31


All Classes: 1901 - A Three Minute Movie About History

Thoughts?  Does this demonstrate whether or not the filmmaker really knows and understands what happened?  Is it just a cool bit of filmmaking?  Or does it mean the filmmaker really had to consider which images to include and how to do so?

Might you make a project like this for class?


Saturday, January 25, 2014

All Classes: Beatboxing Julliard

What if learning looked like this?  What can we learn from creating things like this?

Friday, January 24, 2014

All Classes: Student Motivation

I'd be really interested to hear folks talk about where they fall on this scale if they were to assess themselves.  And it's okay.  I don't hold it against anyone if they are not feeling authentically engaged in my classes -- it lets me know I've got to think about new approaches and strategies.

From Mike Muir's Blog "Multiple Pathways" and adapted from Phil Schlechty 
Authentic Engagement. The student associates the task with a result or product that has meaning and value for the student, such as reading a book on a topic of personal interest or to get information needed to solve a problem the student is actively trying to solve.
Ritual Engagement. The task has little inherent or direct value to the student, but the student associates it with outcomes or results that do have value, as when a student reads a book in order to pass a test.
Passive Compliance. The task is done to avoid negative consequences, although the student sees little meaning or value in the tasks themselves.
Retreatism. The student is disengaged from the tasks and does not attempt to comply with the demands of the task, but does not try to disrupt the work or substitute other activities for it.
Rebellion. The student refuses to do the task, tries to disrupt the work, or attempts to substitute other tasks to which he or she is committed in lieu of those assigned by the teacher.

Testing a Vine Embed

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Friday, January 17, 2014

AP Lit: "Eveline" & Hamlet & Prepping for Poetry Installation

We'll start with our MUGS Apostrophe 1 Quiz and from there . . . 

We have to get our pieces for the poetry installation identified and on the black cart.  We can also talk further and share further about our pieces at this point.  If you are having a piece installed, be certain to complete a curator's sign.   The template is in your Drive.

Then we explore Joyce's "Eveline" via our Literary 3x3 strategy.  We will do an activity where we illuminate the evidence that led to our 3x3s.  It will involve big thinking.  And design kits.

Then more from Hamlet.  

HOMEWORK
Blog: 3+ posts
Req'd Post: Create a Literary 3x3 for Joyce's "Eveline" and for Houseman's "To an Athlete Dying Young."  Choose one of the those two 3x3s and turn it into a thesis statement & map your thinking about an essay.  Those maps can be visual! Or verbal!   Just get 'em up on your blog. 

AE Houseman's "To an Athlete Dying Young" 
James Joyce's "Eveline"
Due: Friday, Jan. 17

Revise: Synthesis #2
Due: Friday, Jan 17 (if you want a 2nd revision)


Installation of Poetry as Design: Monday, Jan 20 (voluntary) 9 a.m.

Read & Create:  Indie Book Project #3
Due: Tuesday/Wednesday, Jan 28/29






Thursday, January 16, 2014

Humanities: Continued w Extreme by Design

Today we started with Roots 8 Quiz.

Then we watched the rest of Extreme by Design.

This was followed by an explanation of the Habits of Mind assessment due next Thursday:

Using your Google Drive, create folders to collect evidence of  your strengths and weakness for each of the 16 habits of mind.

What evidence might you include?
 Screenshots of blog posts, calendars, tweets, FB statuses, etc.
Photos and art
Interviews with friends and family and neighbors
Video footage
Scripts and dialogues
Written explanations

Look in the Humanities OUT folder for an example of how to organize it and what sorts of evidence to collect.

HOMEWORK

Blog: 3+ posts
Req'd: Post your thinking on Extreme by Design.  What do you think about the ideas being shared here? What do you think about this work?  What if Mt. Blue Campus students did this sort of work?


Habits of Mind Assessment (Strengths & Weaknesses)
Due: Thursday, Jan 22

Roots: Quiz & Product 8
Due TODAY

Missing Work: Get It In!
Due: ASAP!

AP Lit 3G: A Bit of a Wonky Day of Lots of Ends of Things

Today started with our MUGS Apostrophes Quiz 1 on NoRedInk.com

Then we made sure our projects were ready to go for the installation.  Everyone who wants their pieces on display should put them on the black cart and complete the curator's note document on the Google Drive.  There's no obligation -- I just think these are all well worth sharing.

I'll be installing between 9 a.m. and 12 p.m. on Monday if you would like to come along and help.

After that we dug into Joyce's "Eveline," using the Literary 3x3 strategy to further illuminate the short story.  We marked up the text of the story while looking at the 3x3s, identifying the evidence that brought us to our conclusions.

We did not get to Hamlet today -- disappointing. Must rectify after our test prep on Monday.

Tuesday, during class, practice test.  Does not count in the gradebook.  Being assessed only for baseline & feedback data.  One multiple choice item (reading and 7 or 8 questions) and one writing prompt (reading and responding) in 45 minutes.  

HOMEWORK
Blog: 3+ posts
Req'd Post: Create a Literary 3x3 for Joyce's "Eveline" and for Houseman's "To an Athlete Dying Young."  Choose one of the those two 3x3s and turn it into a thesis statement & map your thinking about an essay.  Those maps can be visual! Or verbal!   Just get 'em up on your blog. 

AE Houseman's "To an Athlete Dying Young" 
James Joyce's "Eveline"
Due: Friday, Jan. 17

Revise: Synthesis #2
Due: Friday, Jan 17 (if you want a 2nd revision)


Installation of Poetry as Design: Monday, Jan 20 (voluntary) 9 a.m.

Read & Create:  Indie Book Project #3
Due: Tuesday/Wednesday, Jan 28/29

PACE: Mr. Ryder Went Off the Road

Mr. Ryder went off the road.

He's fine.

That's why there's no blog post today.

Hopefully people were productive.

HOMEWORK

Blog: 3+ Posts
Req'd Blog: What's next?  Where should PACE go from here?  More self directed? More guidance?  Should we tackle essay writing -- it's necessary 2nd semester that we write two essays -- or should we dive into Macbeth & the TV/Movie pitching project which helps meet our reading and vocab standards?  What are your thoughts and more importantly WHY?

Where does PACE go from here?
Due: Friday, Jan 17

Complete: Poetry/Music Projects
Due: ASAP

Complete: Project Reflection Paragraphs
Due: ASAP
  1. Product (what did you make?)
  2. Process (how did you make it?)
  3. Outcome (how well did you achieve your goal? what would you change? what would you keep the same?)
Make Up Work: Blogs, Graphic Organizers, Thinking.  Due.  ASAP.
Quarter Ends: Next Friday, Jan 24.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

AP Lit 3G: Hamlet & Literary 3x3 & Thesis Statements & Poetry as Design!

Today were supposed to start with getting NoRedInk.com up and running and the first lesson on there on apostrophes.  Quiz on Thursday.  We didn't get there in class.  It's very easy to set up.  

We'll didn't ripshod over HamletAct II, scene 2.  We saved it because we had all of our poetry as design coolness to share.  Such as these . . .


Inspired by her own poem


Inspired by Mary Lambert

Inspired by Sarah Kay

Inspired by Wilfred Owen

Inspired by her own poem



 (Or at least, part of it. We have a tendency to get carried away on the Hamlet and we have other things to do!)

Then, we'll return to our Literary 3x3s for "Araby" and use them to shape thesis statements & essay maps.  (The results of our work were supposed posted here for perusal but I got caught so up in making thesis statements that I forgot to take pictures.  So . . . here's one I took of my cards afterward.)


Blog: 3+ posts
Req'd Post: Create a Literary 3x3 for Joyce's "Eveline" and for Houseman's "To an Athlete Dying Young."  Choose one of the those two 3x3s and turn it into a thesis statement & map your thinking about an essay.  Those maps can be visual! Or verbal!   Just get 'em up on your blog. 

AE Houseman's "To an Athlete Dying Young" 
James Joyce's "Eveline"
Due: READ for Thursday, Complete the 3x3 for Thursday, but you don't have to have the thesis statement & map on the blog until Friday, Jan. 17

MUGS Quiz: Apostrophes 1
In Class: Thursday, Jan 16 on NoRedInk.com


Revise: Synthesis #2
Due: Friday, Jan 17 (if you want a 2nd revision)


Installation of Poetry as Design: Monday, Jan 20 (voluntary) 9 a.m.


Read & Create:  Indie Book Project #3
Due: Tuesday/Wednesday, Jan 28/29

Note: We will be taking time Jan 28 - Feb 7 to explore our readings & share our products in depth 

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Humanities: Extreme by Design Predictions & Metacognition

We started the day with roots knockout.  Big quiz on Roots 6 through 8 on Thursday.  Also, Roots products due that day as well.

We made some predictions about which Habits of Mind we expected to use today, based on knowing we'll be making predictions about a documentary, watching it, and then testing them.

Then we watched JUST the trailer for Extreme by Design.

We made predictions and think-pair-shared those predictions, highlighting key words in our partners' predictions.

Then we watched the first 17 minutes of the documentary.

After watching we looked at our predictions again and wrote two paragraphs using these stems:

Before we watched the documentary, I thought . . . .

Now that I have watched part of the documentary, I think . . . 

HOMEWORK

Blog: 3+ posts
Req'd: Post your thinking on Extreme by Design.  What do you think about the ideas being shared here? What do you think about this work?  What if Mt. Blue Campus students did this sort of work?

Roots: Quiz & Product 8
Due: Thursday

MUGS: Quiz
Due: Wednesday

Missing Work: Get It In!
Due: ASAP!


PACE: Analyzing "The Mask" by 8 Feet Tall

Today in class we started with a quick review of our key poetic terms for this unit:
Diction
Figurative Language
Repetition
Rhyme

As projects are due, and graphic organizers too, I wanted to make sure our thinking is calibrated going into the final two weeks of the quarter.  

Plus, last night I got a Facebook message from Pete Doom, vocalist/MC/songwriter/generally good dude from the Boston hip hop/funk band, 8 Feet Tall.  They've got a new record out and he sent me a link outta the blue.  It seemed like it fit into the work we've been doing and would be a nice refresher.  Plus, does it get any more "new" than eight hours?  Eight hours, 8 Feet Tall.  See? Strange mojo afoot.  Afoot.  Feet.  See?

Folks started by using their design kits to mark up the lyrics after a first listen.  

Then, in Ohana teams, they analyzed parts of the song on the marker board.  

We wrapped by circulating, sharing, debriefing and connecting.  Very cool when we realized that two or three people in the room had similar ideas even though they weren't working together.  Alignment.

Check the homework below . . . 

The coding? All her idea!  Nice.
Early in the process
Early on
the first big idea that popped
fleshing out the thinking
"Bring your gimmick if you challenge mine" might mean "If you question my opinion, have your own" 
Thinking about repetition and how it contributes to meaning
Articulating some big thinking 
Had a few thoughts about those lines . . . um . . . this is good thinking too!
repetition strikes again
Now the big ideas are coming on fast & furious
Checking out what the others wrote
Boom. (or.. Doom?)
This feels important.
HOMEWORK
Blog: 3+ Posts
Req'd Blog: What's next?  Where should PACE go from here?  More self directed? More guidance?  Should we tackle essay writing -- it's necessary 2nd semester that we write two essays -- or should we dive into Macbeth & the TV/Movie pitching project which helps meet our reading and vocab standards?  What are your thoughts and more importantly WHY?

Where does PACE go from here?

Complete: Poetry/Music Projects
Due: ASAP

Complete: Project Reflection Paragraphs
Due: ASAP
  1. Product (what did you make?)
  2. Process (how did you make it?)
  3. Outcome (how well did you achieve your goal? what would you change? what would you keep the same?)
Make Up Work: Blogs, Graphic Organizers, Thinking.  Due.  ASAP.
Quarter Ends: Next Friday, Jan 24.

Monday, January 13, 2014

Humanities: Habits of Mind, Howe & Howe & Extreme by Design

We are just hammering you with big thinking right now and here comes some more . . .

We'll start with an opt-in MUGS activity to help you with "your/you're" before your quiz on Wednesday.  If you'd like to participate, work with Mr. Ryder on one side of the room.  You may choose to use this time to blog instead, if you feel like you don't need any help understanding the differences between your and you're.

From there, we will do a sorting activity based on the learning styles quizzes you took the other day. You will be up.  You will be moving.  It will be most fantastic.

That takes us to watching a couple of videos that tie in directly to all the work we've been doing with design thinking, habits of mind, and learning styles.

One is this episode of SplitScreen with Shannon Moss featuring the Howe Brothers from Howe & Howe.


The other is a preview of a design thinking documentary we'll be watching in chunks this week, Extreme by Design. 

You can see even more a preview here and more of the documentary here.


We'll be using a variety of strategies to help capture our thinking about these videos and how they tie into the work we've been doing with Habits of Mind.

HOMEWORK
MUGS Quiz  NEXT CLASS!
Habits of Mind Assessment next Thursday and Friday!
Roots Quiz Thursday!

Get your missing work IN!!!!  Revisions!



Literary 3x3 Into Thesis Statements Essay Maps & Poetry!

Today we'll start with getting NoRedInk.com up and running and the first lesson on there.  Quiz on Friday.

We'll run ripshod over Hamlet, Act II, scene 2.  (Or at least, part of it. We have a tendency to get carried away on the Hamlet and we have other things to do!)

Then, we'll return to our Literary 3x3s for "Araby" and use them to shape thesis statements & essay maps.  (The results of our work will be posted here for perusal.)

Then we'll complete the lesson plan from last week:

"From there, we are going to try a little experiment connected to our "Poetry as Design" work.
We will transfer our literary 3x3s to index cards, one word per card.  Thus, every student will end up with a deck of nine cards.  We will start by rearranging our down decks.  What other configurations can we make of those nine words?  It's okay to mentally adjust tense and such to make it work.  
From there, we will continue the experiment by passing decks.  See if you can create a 3x3 with another deck.
And from there, things great really crazy.  We will take the decks.  Combine.  Shuffle.  Deal nine.
And then . . . design poems.  Design a companion poem to Joyce's "Araby" using the nine words (and others) and what you understand about design." 

Blog: 3+ posts
Req'd Post: Create a Literary 3x3 for Joyce's "Eveline" and for Houseman's "To an Athlete Dying Young."  Choose one of the those two 3x3s and turn it into a thesis statement & map your thinking about an essay.  Those maps can be visual! Or verbal!   Just get 'em up on your blog. 

AE Houseman's "To an Athlete Dying Young" 
James Joyce's "Eveline"
Due: Friday, Jan. 17

MUGS Quiz: Apostrophes 1
In Class: Friday, Jan 17 on NoRedInk.com

Revise: Synthesis #2
Due: Friday, Jan 17 (if you want a 2nd revision)


Design & Create: Poetry as Design pieces
Due: Wednesday, Jan 13 (Next Class!)
Installation: Monday, Jan 20 (voluntary)


Read & Create:  Indie Book Project #3
Due: Wednesday, Jan 29

Note: We will be taking time Jan 28 - Feb 7 to explore our readings & share our products in depth 

Thursday, January 9, 2014

AP Lit 3G: Hamlet returns & Araby & Literary 3x3s

Start with Hamlet. Read Hamlet Act II, scene 1 aloud.  Follow my instructions in this video! (It'll involve recording and a little bit of directing from me!)


After completing the Hamlet work you will shift to Joyce's "Araby."  

Share your literary 3x3s of James Joyce's "Araby."  (Next week we will use these 3x3s to formulate thesis statements and propose structure of essays about Joyce's short story.  That's going to be more helpful with me around.) 





From there, we are going to try a little experiment connected to our "Poetry as Design" work.

We will transfer our literary 3x3s to index cards, one word per card.  Thus, every student will end up with a deck of nine cards.  We will start by rearranging our down decks.  What other configurations can we make of those nine words?  It's okay to mentally adjust tense and such to make it work.  

From there, we will continue the experiment by passing decks.  See if you can create a 3x3 with another deck.

And from there, things great really crazy.  We will take the decks.  Combine.  Shuffle.  Deal nine.

And then . . . design poems.  Design a companion poem to Joyce's "Araby" using the nine words (and others) and what you understand about design.

]


Blog: 3+ posts
Req'd Post: Create a Literary 3x3 for one of these other two poems that reflect the contemporary African-American experience of the poets in their respective times (consider them as a collection alongside Clifton's "miss rosie")
Rita Dove's "Vacation"
Paul Laurence Dunbar's "Sympathy"
Due: Friday, Jan. 10
Read & Annotate: "Araby" by James Joyce (check your inbox)Due: Friday, Jan 10
Revise: Synthesis #2
Due: Friday, Jan 17 (if you want a 2nd revision)
Design & Create: Poetry as Design piecesDue: Monday, Jan 13Installation: Monday, Jan 20 (voluntary)
Read & Create:  Indie Book Project #3Due: Wednesday, Jan 29Note: We will be taking time Jan 28 - Feb 7 to explore our readings & share our products in depth 
Heads UpReading Hamlet in Class starting again MUGS quizzes & opt-in mini-lessons on the way

PACE: Getting Ready for the Next Chapter of PACE

Today, I'll be learning how to operate the new lighting arrays in the auditorium and forum.  These are exciting things but pull me away from you.

Here's the thing.  Last class?  I took most of those 40 minutes to lay out the work that needs to happen before we transition to our next work in PACE.  We'll be unpacking writing standards next week and starting out essay.

Today, you have time.  Time. Time. Time.  

  • Time to blog.
  • Time to put the finishing touches on projects.
  • Time to finish the graphic organizers for the poetry unit.
  • Time to write your project reflections -- that must be completed before I assess the project -- a paragraph on product, paragraph on process, and a paragraph on outcome.


Treat those paragraphs just like you have been your thinking about standards and authentic understanding.  If I just write three sentences because that's what makes a paragraph, have I truly reflected on what I've created? If you treat it like busy work, it becomes busy work.  If you  treat it like a meaningful look at your experience making and creating and understanding, it becomes helpful.

Ask yourself: 
Do I really understand figurative language now? How they convey meaning and ideas?  Can I identify specific types of figurative language (hyperbole,  metaphor, personification, etc.)

Do I really understand repetition & rhyme? How they add emphasis?  How they affect the language of a poem in important ways?  

Do I really understand diction and how choosing a particular word can affect a reader?  Can influence meaning?  Have I demonstrated this in my product and have I explained it?

You folks have come so far 2nd Quarter.  Really.  I've been so impressed with everyone these past two months in terms of investment in their thinking.  (Blogs... not so much.  AND... we're righting that ship!  Yes!)

Today is a big deal. Take advantage.  Tuesday we share projects, start MUGS work & unpack writing standards.

HOMEWORK

Blog: 3+ posts
Req'd Post: Create a "What If 2014" list for yourself.  Check out my model in the right sidebar.

Complete: Poetry/Music Projects.  Think about what we talked about the other day with design. Making a finished complete project.

Complete: Graphic organizers.

Complete: Three reflective paragraphs on your poetry/music project: product, process, outcome


Humanities: Knockout & Habits of Mind & Blogging

Today we'll start with an activity to help with vocab, in particular, Roots 8. Knock out.  Roots style. Boom.

From there we will consider the work we have done for the past couple of days and figure out which of the Habits of Mind we've been practicing.  Yup, we've been focused on metacognition, but which of the others as well?

Then we'll briefly review the article we read on metacognition from BrainFacts.org and we will blog.  We'll look at "What If" 2014 over in the right side bar, as well as the other tools under "blogging prompts & rubric" and you will be set up to do your own list on your blog.

That will lead to the survey on learning styles from Edutopia that we didn't take yesterday. Take screen shots. Posts your results.


HOMEWORK

Blog: 3+ posts
Req'd Post: Create your own list of "What If's" for 2014.  Look at Mr Ryder's example in the right sidebar.  He's posted his huge list. 
Due: Friday, Jan 11

Study: Roots 8 (& 6, 7)
Quiz: Thursday, Jan 16
Complete: Word Map or Product for Roots 8 


Practice: MUGS your/you're
Quiz: No Red Ink, Wed Jan 15 

Submit: Missing closing arguments & story corps/photo essays;  self assessments
Put in Humanities IN folder on Google Drive